Faq's edible insects

Biodiversity
Does insect consumption have a negative effect on insect population?

Insects are grown in certified insect farms and source their first livestock population from national repositories or existing commercial farms. Therefore do not affect natural insect populations. In fact, because insect breeding is not land intensive activity, as most mono-culture farming, therefore biodiverse lands can be preserved. In the long run, farming and consuming insects will benefit biodiversity and thus various insect populations.

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Sustainability
Why should I eat insects?

There are various reasons for which you can chose to include insects in your diet. It’s fun! Try sharing these crunchy, packed with delicious flavour insects with friends and family. It’s ENOUGH to get social! They are packed with nutrients. Dried mealworms and crickets are rich in protein, unsaturated fatty acids and various minerals and vitamins. They are good for the environment (but you knew that). Insects emit fewer greenhouse gases and require less water and land for rearing compared to conventional sources of animal protein. You should be proud of eating insects also because of its social impact and power to improve livelihoods. Farmers in Europe must adapt to more sustainable and planet-proof farming practices so they often start growing insects instead of livestock. Insect rearing is a new industry that generates jobs and income for people.

Is eating insect products good for the environment?

When you snack away on ENOUGH Mighty Mealworms and Crispy Criskets instead of cheese chunks you reduce your water footprint and land use by at least 25% and your carbon footprint by at least 50%. It gets even better! When you eat Funky Falafel instead of beef burger you reduce your water footprint by 80%, carbon footprint by 95% and land use by 89%. Mother Earth would be proud! Check your environmental impact here.

Do I contribute to more sustainable future when eating ENOUGH ?

Yes! If you choose to snack away with the Mighty Mealworms and Crispy Cricket from ENOUGH instead of i.e. cheese chunks (very popular and yes animal-based protein snack in The Netherlands) you reduce your water footprint and land use by at least 25% and your carbon footprint by at least 50%.

When you eat Funky Falafel instead of beef burger you reduce your water footprint by 80%, carbon footprint by 95% and land use by 89%.

To check your environmental impact visit our Impact Calculator!

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Animal Welfare
How are insects killed?

Insects are killed just the way they would die in nature. Their body temperature is reduced, they enter into hibernation state and fall asleep.

There are humane ways to kill insects that should be followed because they deserve to be treated with respect. Hakman et al. (2013) recommended in a report to the Dutch government that killing methods for insects should be quick and effective. The methods proposed were freezing (insects are cold blooded), heating (cooking or blanching), and shredding.

The leading researchers in the field, the Entomology Department at Wageningen University recommends that edible insects follow the general principles of animal welfare:

  1. Death occurs without causing pain.
  2. The time required to cause unconsciousness is as short as possible.
  3. The time required to die is as short as possible.
  4. The method is reliable and irreversible.
  5. There is minimal psychological stress on the animal.
  6. The method is safe for the personnel performing the procedure.
  7. The method is in line with the requirements of the culture.
  8. The method is economically acceptable.
  9. The method is simple with little room for error.



How is animal welfare ensured on a farm level?

Insects are farmed animals and internationally accepted ‘Five Freedoms’ set by Farm Animal Welfare Council’s (FAWC) also applies to insects. We take good care of the little creatures ensuring that they have the best possible conditions during each step of their lifecycle.

Freedom form hunger and thirst
Insect are given adequate nutrition daily so that they grow healthy. They are happy consumers of various organic streams that provide all nutrients they need. Insects are fed daily to ensure the feed freshness.

Freedom from discomfort and expressing natural behaviour
Insects show natural crowding behaviour in nature. This natural tendency to grow in high densities and create clusters can be easily mimicked on farm level. Combined with the right temperature and humidity level they have nature’s best conditions.

Freedom from pain, injury, disease
Insect farming environment is safe and provides the right climate and enough space for insects to thrive and express their natural behaviour without the risk of causing pain or injury. Insects have strong immune system by nature and diseases are rare when food quality is controlled.   

Freedom from fear and distress
There is little evidence that insects possess cognitive ability to experience these emotions. Insects are reared in a way they grow effectively, meaning with the right food and the right climate. or and nutritious. The potential distress is minimized at all levels, also during killing step when insects fall into a natural state of hibernation before freezing which one of the humane killing-method.

Can insects feel pain?

This very legitimate question is not easy to answer as straight yes or no. What can be said is that pain experience has been associated with the complexity of the brain. This is measured by the number of neurons present. Number of neurons with different species: human- 16 billion, mouse-75 million, mealworm- 25 thousand.

However it may not be correct to just focus on the neuron number alone. Therefore, the scientific consensus is that insects have a biological response to bad treatment which can be measured. Arnold van Huis just published an article saying we should consider them sentient and treat with respect.

We highly recommend to read the study published by Prof. Arnold van Huis from Laboratory of Entomology at Wageningen University. This research paper is open access and can be found at https://www.wageningenacademic.com/doi/pdf/10.3920/JIFF2019.x004

What about animal welfare of farmed insects?

For the state-of-art- answer we highly recommend to read a recently published research paper by the field expert Prof. Arnold van Huis from Wageningen University. The publication is open access and can be found at https://www.wageningenacademic.com/doi/pdf/10.3920/JIFF2019.x004

We quote the abstract which perfectly summarises this topic:

When discussing insect welfare, the distinction is often made between nociception and pain, the first being a reflex response, while the second refers to a negative emotion perceived by the brain. There is some evidence that insects can experience emotions. Anthropomorphism may influence opinions on the question of how smart animals are. For insects, the precautionary principle is often used: give insects the benefit of the doubt and regard them as ‘sentient beings’. Considering the large number of farmed insects needed for food or feed, some articles discourage the consumption of insects, and favour plant-based diets. However, the protection of food plants also involves the killing of huge numbers of insects. I conclude that in insect farming we need to treat insects as sentient beings.’

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Farming
How are insects processed?

After harvesting, insects are cleaned and processed in accordance with general food safety principles, including quality control checks. Usually the heat treatment (cooking) is applied followed by additional drying process. The food law principles are followed which means microbiological parameters and possible contaminant are strictly monitored to ensure its food safety.

What about animal welfare of farmed insects?

For the state-of-art- answer we highly recommend to read a recently published research paper by the field expert Prof. Arnold van Huis from Wageningen University. The publication is open access and can be found at https://www.wageningenacademic.com/doi/pdf/10.3920/JIFF2019.x004

We quote the abstract which perfectly summarises this topic:

When discussing insect welfare, the distinction is often made between nociception and pain, the first being a reflex response, while the second refers to a negative emotion perceived by the brain. There is some evidence that insects can experience emotions. Anthropomorphism may influence opinions on the question of how smart animals are. For insects, the precautionary principle is often used: give insects the benefit of the doubt and regard them as ‘sentient beings’. Considering the large number of farmed insects needed for food or feed, some articles discourage the consumption of insects, and favour plant-based diets. However, the protection of food plants also involves the killing of huge numbers of insects. I conclude that in insect farming we need to treat insects as sentient beings.’

Where do the insects come from ?

Our insects are grown in registered farms in The Netherlands. The production chain is short, efficient and as sustainable as possible.

What are the insects fed on ?

The insect are fed on 100% certified EU regulated plant based feed.

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Food Safety
Are insects safe to eat?

Yes. Insects are safe to eat after they are cooked, just like any raw food. We have that part covered, so you can enjoy crunching, snacking and sharing directly from the pack!

Can I be allergic to insects?

Insects have allergens similar to those present in crustaceans, molluscs and dust mites. So if you are allergic to one of these please consult an allergy specialist before you consume insects or insect products.

How long can I store ENOUGH products?

ENOUGH snacks can be stored for 6 months from the production date in their original packaging.  After opening, we recommend to consume them within 3 days and close tightly after opening.

Our Funky Falafel range can be stored for 10 months in its original packaging. However, we recommend consuming within 10 days after opening and close tightly after opening.

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Regulatory
Are insects approved as food in Europe?

Insects are novel foods in Europe, which means they need to be officially approved by the European Commission in line with Novel Food Regulation (EC) 2015/2283. The EFSA approval of novel food applications is ongoing. Edible insects are now in transition period which means they can be sold in countries that tolerate marketing and selling them . If you would like to learn more about this topic we highly recommend to read IPIFF publication ‘FAQ Insects as novel foods in the European Union’ avilabel at https://ipiff.org/publications-position-papers/

Where do the insects come from ?

Our insects are grown in registered farms in The Netherlands. The production chain is short, efficient and as sustainable as possible.

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Nutrition
How much insect do I need to eat to replace beef?

A person would have to eat about 30 grams of dried insects to have an equivalent amount of protein and energy as 100 grams of cooked beef.

Why is consuming insects better than eating beef ?

Insects play a big role in the sustainable protein transition. Mealworms and crickets do not produce methane which is a greenhouse gas 20 times stronger than Co2. Next to that breeding is not land-intensive and therefore does not contribute to land expansion and deforestation. Insect farming uses a small fraction of shocking amounts of water required for cattle farming. Insects consume 10 times less feed than cows for producing the same 1kg of protein. There are ENOUGH reasons for you to switch one burger for Funky Falafel.

Are insects nutritious?

Yes! All insect species are rich in essential macro- and micro-nutrients. Dried mealworms and crickets have a high amount of protein (40-60%) including all essential amino acids. They are a good source of polyunsaturated fats, B vitamins, iron, zinc, calcium and magnesium. In addition insects contain fibre in the form of chitin.

How healthy are insects?

Insects are the most healthy when eaten as a part of balanced diet that is rich in wholegrains, beans, legumes, vegetables, nuts and fruit. They give you opportunity to get your daily protein, good fats, vitamins and minerals in a way that is also healthy for the Planet. Always remember to drink ENOUGH water, get ENOUGH sleep and allow ENOUGH time for daily exercise. It is a healthy lifestyle that matters.

Is there a recommended daily intake level for insects ?

Dutch Food Safety Authority has conducted a safety risk assessment for edible insects in 2014. The recommended daily intake was not more than 45g of dried insects (most prevalent form available on that market at that time). This recommendation was made following general precautionary principle in the food industry and took into account the level of chitin in insects (dietary fibre found in exoskeleton). A range of insect-based products are now available on the market. It is a food company’s responsibility to formulate foods that have safe insect inclusion level calculated for an average European consumer. In short, the 45g a day is equivalent to 1 pack of Mighty Mealworms or Crispy Crickets plus 10 falafel balls.

Which vitamins and minerals are present in insects ?

Insects contain B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron and manganese. In order to claim that food products in ‘high in’ or ‘source of’ specific micronutrient a strict EU regulation on present levels must be followed. Our products have ENOUGH goodness so we can say it out-loud in front of pack. For example, our Garlic Rosemary Mighty Mealworms mix with Seeds is a source of iron, a micronutrient responsible for oxygen transport and red blood cells formation. Our Crispy Crickets with Chickpeas are a source of B12, a vitamin needed for normal blood function and transforming our food into energy. ENOUGH energy to be hoppy!

Are fats present in insects good or bad?

Insects contain mostly unsaturated fats (the good ones!) such as polyunsaturated linoleic acid (omega-6), alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3) and monounsaturated oleic acid (omega-9) which is the major fatty acid found in olive oil.

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Eating insects
Are insects safe to eat?

Yes. Insects are safe to eat after they are cooked, just like any raw food. We have that part covered, so you can enjoy crunching, snacking and sharing directly from the pack!

Why should I eat insects?

There are various reasons for which you can chose to include insects in your diet. It’s fun! Try sharing these crunchy, packed with delicious flavour insects with friends and family. It’s ENOUGH to get social! They are packed with nutrients. Dried mealworms and crickets are rich in protein, unsaturated fatty acids and various minerals and vitamins. They are good for the environment (but you knew that). Insects emit fewer greenhouse gases and require less water and land for rearing compared to conventional sources of animal protein. You should be proud of eating insects also because of its social impact and power to improve livelihoods. Farmers in Europe must adapt to more sustainable and planet-proof farming practices so they often start growing insects instead of livestock. Insect rearing is a new industry that generates jobs and income for people.

Is eating insect products good for the environment?

When you snack away on ENOUGH Mighty Mealworms and Crispy Criskets instead of cheese chunks you reduce your water footprint and land use by at least 25% and your carbon footprint by at least 50%. It gets even better! When you eat Funky Falafel instead of beef burger you reduce your water footprint by 80%, carbon footprint by 95% and land use by 89%. Mother Earth would be proud! Check your environmental impact here.

How do insects taste like?

Well, the best way is to try yourself of course. We have seasoned our snacks with natural delicious herbs and spices so you can get the familiar taste while having completely new falvour experience! All simply natural, with no flavour additives or enhancers. It's also a taste of doing something great for yourself and the Planet! And there is ENOUGH flavour to feed all taste buds, sweet and savoury. All simply natural, with no flavour additives or enhancers.

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